Spring Treasure; Marinade

We had our first barbecue of the season last week and ribs yesterday.For our first barbecue; I marinated pork chops in a curried mango sauce. Then my husband barbecued them on low flame, to perfection. They were sooo good! I made a cream cheese and chive mashed potatoe and roasted veg.

I am always wanting to change up my marinades for steak and chicken. I’ve tried stock with different herbs, made pastes with chilis and lemon, the traditional BBQ sauce and pre-made teriyaki or souvlaki.

Why not use sauces that are usually marketed for other uses as a marinade, such as:
• Italian salad dressing(very good for steak)
• butter chicken sauce
• pasta sauce
• condensed soup
• zucchini relish
• broth with puréed sweet potatoe or other veg
Try them out.

Break out of your routine recipe box.

Living Wall/ Green Wall

A living wall inside my home is a great use of space and a beautiful health-wise addition. I will now be finding a way to make one work for our family in hopes to grow herbs and food indoors. Happy Earth Day!

inspirationenergy

GREEN WALLS 3

 

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A living wall is either a hedge that is entirely composed of plants, such as trimmed shrubs, or a wall that is partially or completely covered by plants. The latter is commonly referred to as a “green wall”, particularly with the development of recent technological innovations that allow for walls to be entirely covered by irrigated living plants.

Living walls help to reduce local wind speeds, traffic noise, and localized temperature extremes (urban heat islands) by shading and converting liquid water to water vapour (evapotranspiration) which cools the air. They help to improve air quality by reducing dust and particulates and help to reduce the amount of heat lost from a home. Another significant benefit is the increase in biodiversity, along with aid for food and shelter for wildlife.

Living walls may have a positive impact on both physical and mental health and wellbeing. Green views and access to…

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Spring Treasure; Starting Seeds

If you are garden savvy or want to try your hand at growing your own food, it is easily done with the right information to start you off. It is easiest to buy a plastic seedling tray, or humidome, with a lid if you are trying this for the first time.

Most seeds should be started between 4-8 weeks before the last frost, depending on what it is. Some seeds such as flowers and peas are sowed directly in the soil after all frost probability has passed. Each pack of seeds has instructions as to how to handle planting.

Once you have your Humidome, fill each rooting cell with pre-moistened ‘seed starting soil’ about 2/3 full. Place a couple of seeds on top and cover with a thin layer of soil. Mist all cells with warm water, lightly. Be sure to label or separate between different types of seeds. Cover, keep moist and in a bright sunny spot, but not somewhere that gets direct sunlight. Take the lid off when your plants are an inch or so high. Once you see fine white roots you can plant them in large containers or in your garden after the last frost.

I have failed with starting seeds of some flowers at the point when I have to take the lid off. I still am not sure why. Nevertheless, it was much easier than I thought. All you need to do is read the seed requirements, keep soil moist and watch the progress. I listened to my intuition as well.
Either way, it is very rewarding when they grow those tiny little plants right in front of your eyes.

I encourage people of all ages, abilities, time and space restrictions to try a garden of their own.
When my mother-in-law visits us from El Salvador, she frequently watches and picks from the garden. She seems to take pride and much joy in choosing what she wants for us that day.
It is especially relaxing. I am adding this self-sufficient, observant, patient, gross and fine motor activity to my daughters learning right now.

I’d love to hear what you grow and what worked or didn’t in your garden!